The Offline Commentators

The scale of Forrester’s participation explains very well how the phenomenon of content generated by users is something different from what we could imagine. In Spain, for example (according to 2009 data), only 15% of users are “creators”. However, 56% are “observers” who read the blogs, watch the videos or follow the tweets of that still small group of creators. You can play with the data here:

The conclusion of the data for Spain is that, in your next initiative related to the social web, you will not find millions of users uploading videos or writing articles about their experiences: they will be only a few thousand, but they will influence a number of users about three times greater.
Although it is useful for limiting expectations, the Forrester model has one important limitation: it only analyzes online behavior. The reality is that there is no wall between what we do on and off : we comment in person what we have read on the Internet or publish on the Internet about what we have lived far from the screen and the keyboard.
In my particular case, it frequently happens to me that people who have never left a comment on the blog tell me in person what they liked or liked.
How many are these “offline commentators”? I do not know, but I am clear that we need to move forward in measuring the influence of the Internet in all areas, and not only on online behavior : not doing so would be the equivalent of measuring the effectiveness of TV advertising on consumers only when They are on the sofa and not when they are in Mercadona or Carrefour choosing what detergent to buy.
Do you have any experience with offline commentators? Maybe you’re one of them? … although, if you are, I’m afraid I will not know until we meet in person

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